4 the World blog

Empowering collaborative communities


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YA books about immigration

One of the many benefits of reading young adult literature is that it helps build empathy in our youth.  Here are a list of books that describe the experience of young people moving to the U.S. because of war, drought, or jobs and the struggles they undergo as they transition to their new life.

Shooting Kabul – Afghanistan American
Esperenza Rising – Mexican American
Inside Out and Back Again – Vietnamese American
The Hundred Dresses – Polish American

Inside Out and Back Again

 

 

 

 

Do you want to know what research says about a hot topic in education? The National Education Policy Center provides policy briefs that summarize the existing research. They are free and open to the public. Go to their website when you want to know what is going on in education –without all of the hype and spin.

Here is the website:

http://nepc.colorado.edu/publications/policy-briefs


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Gender and Literacy: Using a Feminist Lens to Promote Multiple Literacies and Advance Teacher Expertise

In the last three decades, a call of alarm has sounded claiming a boy crisis in literacy education. PISA & NAEP scores show a gender gap in literacy across grade-levels and across countries. We see girls outperforming boys in reading tests study after study. However, mean test scores only tell us part of the story. There is more disparity within each gender than there is between the genders. There are more boys at the bottom of the test score distribution but there are also more boys in the top (Cole, 1997).

If we really want to know if there is a crisis in literacy education, then we need to look at more than test scores. Contemporary research has looked at economic and social outcomes based on gender. Fleming (2000) reported that wage gaps between men and women persist, poverty continues to disproportionately affect women and children, domestic and sexual assault leaves women as victims more often, and gender bias and stereotypes are rampant in and out of classrooms.

Although research has examined gender-related inequities in and out of school (notably Sadker, Sadker & Zittleman, 2009), less research explores the current school experiences of girls and the role that school plays in helping all gender identities disrupt inequitable systems. This NCTE symposium attempts to address that gap by exploring various aspects of literacy through a feminist theory lens. Feminist theory is dedicated to examining issues of equality and dismantling sexism as well as other forms of oppression.

Amy Vetter will begin our symposium with Exploring Girlhood: The Literacy Experiences of One Girl in a Young Writers’ Camp. Dr. Vetter’s study explores how Addison, a high school girl in a young writers’ camp outside of school constructed and enacted writer identities.

I will follow with Dialogism: Feminist Revision of Argumentative Writing Instruction, in which I explore how feminist pedagogy can inform the instruction of writing aligned to the ELA CCSS for 9th-12th.

The third presentation by Tara Anderson is Deconstructing Gender Binaries With YA Literature will describe the value of literature that goes beyond the “LG” in “LGBTQIA” and with specific strategies for guiding students through critical conversations about gender.

Our fourth presenter, Brooke Langston-Demott will discuss her study (Critical Literacy: Challenging Traditional Gender Positions) focused on instruction dedicated to examining gender issues through literature in a fifth grade class.

We will end by inviting you to enter the conversation and share what educators can do to change the current gender inequities that exist in and out of classrooms. Not able to come? Join our conversation on Twitter #FeministPedagogy

NCTE Convention    |          Nov. 21 @4:15     |               Room M100E


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Global Experiential Learning for Teachers

Global-readiness includes the literacies, competencies, and dispositions students need in order to work, live, and interact effectively and peacefully with anyone in the world from anywhere in the world. We must train our teachers on teaching for global-readiness in order to prepare the entire generation in school for global-readiness and global leadership.

Many  articles and books have been published about internationalizing education beginning in the 1990s  (e.g. Altbach,1997; Cavusgil, 1993; De Wit, 2002; Engberg & Green, 2002; Green & Olson, 2003;Hayward, 2000; Klasek, 1992; J. Knight, 1994; Lambert, 1989; McCarthy, 1998; Mestenhauser & Ellingboe, 1998; Powar, 2002; Scherer, Beaton, Ainina, & Meyer, 2000;Scott, 1998; Siaya & Hayward, 2003).

To prepare global-ready teachers, Yuen (2010) suggests internationalizing teacher education by infusing global experiences that teachers can then share with students. This perspective has been applied to in-service teachers in the research as well. The research on internationalizing pre-service and in-service teacher educBelize - Calla Creek School collageation shows promise for promoting global-ready teaching. 4 the World offers cross-cultural experiential learning for pre-service and in-service teachers during fall, spring, and summer breaks.

To learn more, visit http://www.4theworld.org/excursions.html .


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You were accepted into a PhD program in education, now what?

The summer before I started my PhD program in education, I was eager to start reading, so I logged into my university’s website everyday to see if professors had uploaded book lists. One of my professors required us to read They Say, I Say, not as part of our course content but in order to learn to write like an academic. I’m so thankful I read it, and I wanted to share with you some other books that I discovered later in my program that I wished I would have read right away.

On Academic Writing:

About Research:

Add books that you found helpful in the comments. And, good luck!


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Skills of the Multiliterate Student

From multiliteracyrevolution.wordpress.com

multiliteracyrevolution

Learning has changed.

The way we acquire, sift through, analyze, and synthesize knowledge within a global, digital world has forced us to use a different skill set. Becoming “literate” in the 21st century is much more than learning how to navigate written text. To truly thrive witin this new learning paradigm, one must become multiliterate.  Therefore, “literacy pedagogy now must account for the burgeoning variety of text forms” (New London Group, 1996, p. 2). Multiliteracies then is the  recognition of the “multiplicity of communications channels and media, and the increasing saliency of cultural and linguistic diversity,” focusing on “the realities of increasing local diversity and global connectedness,” (New London Group, 1996, p.3).

Students must be taught a skill set that reflects this new context of learning. Not only will they need to learn letter-sound relationships but also how to freely move in between formal and informal text, analyze text and…

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You Can Support NC Teachers Global Learning

Our world is increasingly interconnected economically, politically, technologically, ecologically, and socially (Merriweather, 1998). Our schools worldwide must prepare students for work, private, and public life in a global society (The New London Group, 1996). This means that in addition to college, career, and civic ready, students must also be global-ready. Global-ready means ready to work, live, and interact with anyone in the world from anywhere in the world (Zhao, 2010).Donna in Belize with  cropped

Experiential Learning for Global Competence

Experience is the primary to the learning process (Kolb, Boyatzis, & Mainemelis, 2002). Direct experiences with people of different cultures has been reported by teachers as the most influential means of gaining cultural understanding about different cultures (Merryfield, 2000). This has lead 4 THE WORLD to create experiential professional development in Central America. 4 THE WORLD’s Global Experiential Learning Excursion takes educators to schools in rural Belize and Guatemala on spring break. US teachers experience life in the developing world and learn the history, culture, and contemporary issues of our Central American neighbors.

4 THE WORLD’s global learning model is listen, learn, and act. In professional development sessions, teachers consider issues of importance in Belize and Guatemala by listening to teachers, students, and community leaders in-country.  Teachers then identify a pressing problem to investigate and learn about the issue from diverse perspectives.  After assessing the possible solutions, the teachers facilitate collaboration for students in North America and Central America to partner and take action to implement a solution.  The process then starts over, as the teachers and students listen to those affected and assess the solution, identifying strengths and weaknesses and learn from the experience in order to improve the world one project at a time.

How You Can Help

This March, 6 teachers from North Carolina would like to experience this professional development opportunity.  But, as you probably have heard, North Carolina teacher salaries rank near the bottom of the states.  Airfare will cost $750 for each teacher. You can contribute $100, $25, or even $10 to help out.  This helps not only these teachers become better teachers but in turn benefits the 100s of students they have every year.

To make a Donation:

1. Go to

https://donatenow.networkforgood.org/1421440?uniqueID=634870486156807932

2. Fill out the form on behalf of NC Teachers

Type NC Teachers on the form

3. Share with your friends so they can do the same!

References

Kolb, D. A., Boyatzis, R. E., & Mainemelis, C. (2001). Experiential learning theory: Previous research and new directions. Perspectives on thinking, learning, and cognitive styles1, 227-247.

Merryfield, M. M. (1998). Pedagogy for global perspectives in education: Studies of teachers’ thinking and practice. Theory & Research in Social Education26(3), 342-379.

Merryfield, M. M. (2000). Why aren’t teachers being prepared to teach for diversity, equity, and global interconnectedness? A study of lived experiences in the making of multicultural and global educators. Teaching and teacher education16(4), 429-443.

Partnership for 21st Century Skills & VIF. (2014). Retrieved from http://www.p21.org/our-work/global-education

The New London Group.(1996). A pedagogy of multiliteracies: Designing social futures. Harvard Educational Review66(1), 60-92.

Zhao, Y. (2011). Preparing globally competent teachers: A new imperative for teacher education. Journal of Teacher Education61(5), 422-431.


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Bishop Gene Robinson on discrimination from God Believes in Love

“It is difficult for a majority to see, let alone sympathize with, a practice that discriminates against a minority. It’s not unlike trying to get a fish to understand the concept of water! It is simply the medium in which the fish resides, requiring no cognition of the water that supports it. Discrimination–not just individual, but systemic–is the “water” in which the majority swims, and unless something happens to bring that discrimination into the view and consciousness of the majority, nothing will change, because the majority hardly, if ever, notices it.”

~Bishop Gene Robinson, from God Believes in Love

GLobal Education Conference Presenter Badge


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Mutually Beneficial Professional Development for Teachers in North and Central America

Global Education Conference 2014 logo


Our world is increasingly interconnected economically, politically, technologically, ecologically, and socially (Merriweather, 1998). Our schools worldwide must prepare students for work, private, and public life in a global society (The New London Group, 1996). This means that in addition to college, career, and civic ready, students must also be global-ready. Global-ready means ready to work, live, and interact with anyone in the world from anywhere in the world (Zhao, 2010). Global-readiness includes global competence and 21st century skills (Partnership for 21st Century Skills & VIF, 2014). Teachers are expected to promote global competence and 21st century skills in their students, but may not be globally competent or 21st century literate themselves.

Experiential Learning for Global Competence

Experiential learning theory places experience as primary to the learning process (Kolb, Boyatzis, & Mainemelis, 2002). Kolb, Boyatzis, & Mainemelis (2002) describe the four steps of experiential learning as concrete experience, reflective observation, abstract conceptualization, and active experimentation. Direct experiences with people of different cultures has been reported by pre-service and in-service teachers as the most influential means of gaining cultural competence (Merryfield, 2000). This has lead researchers to examine experiential professional development as a means to increase teachers’ cultural knowledge and intercultural sensitivity. Much literature has been produced about study abroad experiences for pre-service teachers, but what about teachers who may not have the ability to live abroad for months at a time? 4 THE WORLD’s Global Experiential Learning Excursion takes educators to schools in rural Belize and Guatemala on fall, spring, and summer breaks. Educators experience life in the developing world and learn the history, culture, and contemporary issues of our Central American neighbors.

Professional Development for K-12 Educators

4 THE WORLD is a US non-profit organization that provides support for communities around the globe. 4 the World has provided books, school supplies, and technology; constructed school buildings, playgrounds, and restrooms; initiated pupil feeding programs and supplied food; mended water purifying systems; granted secondary school scholarships; conducted fun and educational day camps for children, and provided teacher professional development on topics such as literacy and technology. Their mission is to identify and collaborate with communities across the globe to empower them to identify and solve the most pressing needs of their communities within the areas of health and education. By partnering with communities and educators, 4 THE WORLD provides a critical link that utilizes the assets of each partner to help meet the needs of the other partners.

Historically, teachers in developing countries have limited formal training in teaching.  In Belize, only 49% of primary school teachers held an associate’s degree or higher (Ministry of Education and Sports, 1999, p. 49). Less than 60% of teachers in Belize had any pedagogical training (UNESCO, 2005). 4 THE WORLD is acutely aware that every teacher, every school, and every community has specific needs and desires and that these must be fully taken into account before professional development is implemented. In order to respect the autonomy and dignity of these teachers, I conduct an annual survey of teachers from beneficiary schools to ask if professional development is desired and if so, what topics are pressing. North American teachers who apply for the trip are asked about their experiences and areas of expertise. The list of professional development topics are then matched with North American teachers’ experiences and areas of expertise. Lessons from past professional development sessions will be shared at the conference presentation.

Educators on Location

Traveling teachers from North America follow 4 THE WORLD’s iterative model for problem-solving: (a) identify the problem, (b) assess the solutions, and (c) collaborate to implement a solution. This model emphasizes working with the people affected by the problem in order to solve the problem in a sustainable way. 4 THE WORLD’s model for problem-solving works for small groups of children in a classroom all the way to international organizations working on vital development issues.

4 THE WORLD organizes trips from North America to Central America for pre-service teachers, in-service teachers, and teacher educators. The North American teachers choose a global theme from their curriculum to explore from diverse perspectives while traveling.   (The conference presentation will include discussion of past project topics.) 4 THE WOLRD provides professional development on how to use global themes to integrate problem-based learning with global learning.

4 THE WORLD’s global learning model is listen, learn, and act. In professional development sessions, teachers consider issues of importance in Belize and Guatemala by listening to teachers, students, and community leaders in-country.  Teachers then identify a pressing problem to investigate and learn about the issue from diverse perspectives.  After assessing the possible solutions, the teachers facilitate collaboration for students in North America and Central America to partner and take action to implement a solution.  The process then starts over, as the teachers and students listen to those affected and assess the solution, identifying strengths and weaknesses and learn from the experience in order to improve the world one project at a time.

While in-country, the North American teachers provide professional development training sessions for teachers in Central America.  The session topics are based on Central American teachers’ requests on the annual survey and North American teachers’ potential of expert knowledge.

These experiential global learning trips support capacity-building initiatives for the communities, professional development for teachers in North and Central America, and global experiences for the traveling teachers. Ultimately, these partnerships help everyone connected contribute in the present and continue to grow and thrive in the future.

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References

4 the World. (2014). Retrieved from http://4theworld.org

Kolb, D. A., Boyatzis, R. E., & Mainemelis, C. (2001). Experiential learning theory: Previous research and new directions. Perspectives on thinking, learning, and cognitive styles, 1, 227-247.

Merryfield, M. M. (1998). Pedagogy for global perspectives in education: Studies of teachers’ thinking and practice. Theory & Research in Social Education, 26(3), 342-379.

Merryfield, M. M. (2000). Why aren’t teachers being prepared to teach for diversity, equity, and global interconnectedness? A study of lived experiences in the making of multicultural and global educators. Teaching and teacher education, 16(4), 429-443.

Ministry of Education and Sports (1999). Belize: Education statistics. Retrieved from http://www.childinfo.org/files/LAC_Belize.pdf

Partnership for 21st Century Skills & VIF. (2014). Retrieved from http://www.p21.org/our-work/global-education

Statistical Institute of Belize. (2012). Abstract of Statistics: Belize. Retrieved from http://www.statisticsbelize.org.bz/

Zhao, Y. (2011). Preparing globally competent teachers: A new imperative for teacher education. Journal of Teacher Education, 61(5), 422-431.

The New London Group.(1996). A pedagogy of multiliteracies: Designing social futures. Harvard Educational Review, 66(1), 60-92.

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Institute for Statistics. (2005). Education for all: The quality imperative. Retrieved from http://www.unesco.org/new/en/education/themes/leading-the-international-agenda/efareport/reports/2005-quality/


Join me as I present this topic at the Global Education Conference on Friday, November 21 at 10am US Eastern Time.  All presentations are virtual.  You can find my session information at http://www.globaleducationconference.com/forum/topics/mutually-beneficial-professional-development-for-teachers-in and view the calendar at http://www.globaleducationconference.com/page/globaledcon-schedule-gmt-5


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Global Education Initiative

The Partnership for 21st century Skills released their Global Education Initiative for states.

1. Global Competency Standards for Students and Teachers
2. Effective and scalable teacher supports, resources, and tools for infusing classroom with global knowledge and skills
3. A New Approach to Language Instruction that includes statewide dual language/immersion plan beginning in elementary school and refocusing traditional high school world language courses
4. Whole-School Models that include internationally-themed schools, transformation models for low-performing schools, and regional dual language/immersion schools
5. Networking and Recognizing Districts, Schools and Educators to drive implementation and innovation
6. Global experiences for students and educators including teacher exchange, educational travel, virtual exchange, and global academic competitions

Read more at http://www.p21.org/news-events/press-releases/1495-p21-releases-framework-for-state-action-on-global-education-framework